How To Hold A Golf Club Right Handed

While there are an infinite number of ways that players hold a golf club right handed, there are three basic ways to do it with an unlimited number of variations after that. The three main grip types that are being used are the interlocking grip, the overlapping grip, and the 10 finger grip.

The main differences that we are exploring here come from the underside of the grip as you can see from the picture below:

golf-grip-right-handed-players

Picture from: http://www.coastalbreezenews.com/2014/06/03/the-four-pre-swing-fundamentals-part-1-of-4/

The specifics of how each hand is placed on the club will be discussed in great detail later in this chapter. The main point here is to understand the differences between these three most common grip types and finding which one is the most comfortable for the player.

3 Basic Ways To Grip A Golf Club Right Handed

10 Finger Grip

The picture on the far left is the underside of the ten finger grip. This grip is also referred to as the baseball grip. As you can see from the picture, all ten fingers go onto the handle of the club. The ten finger grip can be a very effective grip for a player to employ. Unfortunately, it has been frowned upon for several generations of golf instruction simply because it does not “seem right.”

Overlap Grip

The picture in the center is the underside of the overlapping grip. You can start by taking the ten finger grip and simply lifting your right-hand pinky finger and slide your right-hand closer to your left hand. The player then will place the pinky in between the index finger and the middle finger of their left hand.

Interlocking Grip

The picture on the far right is the underside of the interlocking grip. To create the interlocking grip, the player can start with the overlapping grip. The player will simply lift their pinky finger and allow the index finger of the left hand to be placed between the pinky finger and ring finger of your right hand. Then allow fingers to grip the handle of the club.

Golf Grip Hand Position 

As we begin to talk about how to grip a golf club right handed, we will first discuss the lead hand or the left hand for right-handed golfers.

As was brought up earlier, there are an infinite amount of variations to a golf grip. Many agree on the three basics grip types previously discussed. However, there is much discussion about the role each hand plays in the grip and how they should be positioned on the golf club.

The variations of the overlapping grip, interlocking grip and the ten finger grip then morph into having the left hand (lead hand) and/or the right hand (trail hand) in a weak position, neutral position or a strong position. The PGA of America refers to these as an open faced grip, a neutral grip as well as a closed face grip (Golf Glossary and Golf Terms , n.d.).

The model grip for a player is going to be dependent on many variables such as strength, arm swing versus body swing and body speed while rotating.

Common golf instruction often refers to the V from by the left thumb pressing up against the left palm as well as the V made by the right thumb pressing up against the right palm. Depending on where the V’s are pointing, the grip will then be referred to as a weak, neutral or strong grip.

Hold A Golf Club Right Handed

Weak Grip / Open Faced Grip For The Left Hand

The weak grip or open faced grip with the left hand is said to be achieved when the player can look down and see less than two knuckles. With a weak grip or open faced grip, the V of the left hand will be pointing more towards the player’s chin. This grip is achieved by turning the hands in a counter clockwise motion around the handle or to the left. This allows the left thumb to rest more on the target side of the shaft. The more the hands are turned around the club, the more the clubface will be influenced.

Strong Grip / Closed Face Grip For The Left Hand

The strong or the closed face grip with the left hand is said to be achieved when the player can look down and see three knuckles or more. With a strong grip or a closed face grip, the V of the left hand would be pointing more towards the right shoulder. This grip is achieved by turning the hands in a clockwise motion around the handle or to the right. This allows the left thumb to rest clearly on the right side of the grip. The more the hands are turned around the club, the more the clubface will be influenced.

Neutral Grip For The Left Hand

The neutral grip with the left hand is said to be achieved when the player can look down and see two knuckles. Holding the club this way allows the player to blend an arm and body motion together. With a neutral grip, the V of the left hand would be pointing towards the right ear. And the left thumb would be just on the right side of the grip.

Now that we have discussed the proper hand positions for your left hand in a golf grip, we will now discuss the options for the right-hand grip for right-handed golfers.

Weak Grip / Open Faced Grip For The Right Hand

The weak grip or open faced grip with the right hand is said to be achieved when the player can look down and the V made between the thumb and the palm is pointing more towards the chin. This grip is achieved by turning the right hand in a counterclockwise motion around the handle or towards the target. The more the hands are turned around the club, the more the clubface will be influenced.

Strong Grip / Closed Face Grip For The Right Hand

With a strong grip or a closed face grip with the right hand, the V of the right hand would be pointing more towards the right shoulder. This grip is achieved by turning the hands in a clockwise motion around the handle. This allows the left thumb to rest clearly on the right side of the grip. The more the hands are turned around the club, the more the clubface will be influenced.

Neutral Grip For The Right Hand

The neutral grip with the right hand is said to be achieved when the player can look down and the V made between the thumb and palm is pointing approximately at the right ear. Holding the club this way allows the player to blend an arm and body motion together. With a neutral grip, the V of the left hand would be pointing towards the right ear. And the right thumb would be just on the right side of the grip.

As you can now see, there are an unbelievable amount of combinations of how to hold a golf club right-handed. The different grips have different plusses and minuses with each. Make sure you understand how a grip change will alter your club face. Depending on the shape of shot that you are wanting to hit, it could make it easier for you or almost impossible.

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